Shalom!

Welcome to Clifton Park Chabad Jewish Center! Here at Chabad, you will find a wide array of programming designed to enhance Jewish life in southern Saratoga County. We strive to create an environment where every person is welcome, every individual Mitzvah is cherished, and where Judaism is an accessible reality to all Jews regardless of background, affiliation or age! Through Shabbat Dinners, Holiday events, Jewish Womens circle, Chabad Hebrew school and everything in between, we are cultivating a community together. We look forward to meeting you in person at a Shabbat dinner, Torah class or a casual coffee date.

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"Rabbi, what do I do with annoying people? They are not harming me in any way, just really annoying. Thanks, James"

Hey James!

First, I am not crazy about the term annoying people. And I will tell you why: who said they are annoying people? Maybe you are the only one who finds them annoying? Perhaps they are wonderful people going through a tough time, which is why they act the way they do?

Instead, let's address the question: what do we do when we encounter annoying behavior.

In broad terms, you have two options to choose from:

1. Let it slide.

2. Try to stop it.

How would you know which option is the correct one? Just like everything in life, it depends.

And to find the best answer, let's look at the Torah. We can actually see the answer in this week's Parsha!

This week we are reading about how the Jewish people were threatened by two enemies.

The first enemy, described at the beginning of the Parsha, is the Egyptians. The second one is the Amalek nation.

G-d had very different instructions for each enemy.

When the Egyptians chased the Jewish people, G-d told them to avoid any war. Instead, let them march forward and pay no attention to the possible threat. But when it came to the Amalekites, G-d told them to wage war against them.

Why the difference?

The Rebbe brings a beautiful answer.

Look at the location of each enemy. The Egyptians were behind them, and the Amalekites were in front, blocking the Jews' way to Mount Sinai to receive the Torah.

So while they could have ignored the Egyptians and moved forward, they didn't have a choice but to confront the Amalekites, so they could reach their destination!

So, if you encounter a behavior that is bothering you, you need to ask yourself: what will happen if I will "let it slide" and not do anything about it? Can I still accomplish what I need to? Can I still do my G-d's given mission in life?

If the answer is yes, then you can keep on moving ahead. It would be best if you learned not to be bothered by it (practice deep breathing!!), but overall you can pay less attention to that behavior.

If, however, you are being blocked from accomplishing what you need to in life, and your way towards "Mount Sinai" is obstructed... you might have no choice but to deal with it.

To talk to the person; to speak to others who can influence that person; and while doing it, being very sensitive not to hurt their feelings. Still, avoid avoiding the situation and do what you can to solve it.

Wishing you all the best
Shabbat Shalom!
Light candles 4:53 pm, Shabbat ends at 5:56 pm
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Brave the cold! Shabbat dinner this week will be something special!
Come warm up with a variety of specialty soups and Torah thoughts to warm your body and soul!

What? Shabbat dinner, celebrating our generation's unique mission! Read more below!
When? Friday, February 3rd, 5:00 pm
Where? Clifton Park Chabad, 495 Moe Road
----
10 (Yud) Shevat
Yud Shvat is the anniversary of the passing of Rabbi Yosef Yitzchak Schneersohn, sixth Rebbe of Lubavitch, of blessed memory, (5710/1950). On the same day, one year later, his son-in-law, Rabbi Menachem M. Schneerson, assumed the mantle of leadership of Chabad.

During a farbrengen–a Chassidic gathering that evening, the Rebbe delivered his inaugural discourse titled Bati Legani— “Enter my Garden,” marking his official acceptance of the position of Rebbe.

He described the world as Hashem's garden and our mission to reveal it!

How, you ask? read on...
He made a statement establishing his “agenda”. Freely translated it reads in part, “If you see a person who has love of G‑d but lacks love of Torah and love of his fellow, you must tell him that his love of G‑d is incomplete. And if you see a person who has only love for his fellow, you must strive to bring him to love of Torah and love of G‑d—so that his love toward his fellows should not only be expressed in providing bread for the hungry and water for the thirsty, but also to bring them close to Torah and to G‑d.”

With this mission statement, the Rebbe changed the face of world Jewry.

The day is marked by Torah study, Chassidic gatherings and reaffirmation to the Rebbe’s mission as articulated above.
Events around the world will celebrate the 73rd year of the Rebbe’s vision and monumental revolution of Jewish life.
To learn more about the Rebbe, visit Rebbe.org.

We will be celebrating with Shabbat dinner this week.
Intrigued? Brave the cold and come warm up inside and out!
www.cliftonparkchabad.com or text 5184950779
... See MoreSee Less

Brave the cold! Shabbat dinner this week will be something special! 
Come warm up with a variety of specialty soups and Torah thoughts to warm your body and soul! 

What? Shabbat dinner, celebrating our generations unique mission! Read more below!
When? Friday, February 3rd, 5:00 pm
Where? Clifton Park Chabad, 495 Moe Road
----
10 (Yud) Shevat
Yud Shvat is the anniversary of the passing of Rabbi Yosef Yitzchak Schneersohn, sixth Rebbe of Lubavitch, of blessed memory, (5710/1950). On the same day, one year later, his son-in-law, Rabbi Menachem M. Schneerson, assumed the mantle of leadership of Chabad.

During a farbrengen–a Chassidic gathering that evening, the Rebbe delivered his inaugural discourse titled Bati Legani— “Enter my Garden,” marking his official acceptance of the position of Rebbe. 

He described the world as Hashems garden and our mission to reveal it!

How, you ask? read on...
He made a statement establishing his “agenda”. Freely translated it reads in part, “If you see a person who has love of G‑d but lacks love of Torah and love of his fellow, you must tell him that his love of G‑d is incomplete. And if you see a person who has only love for his fellow, you must strive to bring him to love of Torah and love of G‑d—so that his love toward his fellows should not only be expressed in providing bread for the hungry and water for the thirsty, but also to bring them close to Torah and to G‑d.”

With this mission statement, the Rebbe changed the face of world Jewry.

The day is marked by Torah study, Chassidic gatherings and reaffirmation to the Rebbe’s mission as articulated above. 
Events around the world will celebrate the 73rd year of the Rebbe’s vision and monumental revolution of Jewish life.
To learn more about the Rebbe, visit Rebbe.org.

We will be celebrating with Shabbat dinner this week.
Intrigued? Brave the cold and come warm up inside and out!
www.cliftonparkchabad.com or text 5184950779
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