Shalom!

Welcome to Clifton Park Chabad Jewish Center! Here at Chabad, you will find a wide array of programming designed to enhance Jewish life in southern Saratoga County. We strive to create an environment where every person is welcome, every individual Mitzvah is cherished, and where Judaism is an accessible reality to all Jews regardless of background, affiliation or age! Through Shabbat Dinners, Holiday events, Jewish Womens circle, Chabad Hebrew school and everything in between, we are cultivating a community together. We look forward to meeting you in person at a Shabbat dinner, Torah class or a casual coffee date.

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This month of Av, we highlight the Jewish birthday! Take a moment to find out what the big deal is, why we celebrate and what day your special day really is!!
We started the month with birthdays and will end it with a birthday as well! Join us on Sunday, August 8th for a communal BBQ at Collins Park, also Mendel's Hebrew birthday. He will be at hand with his Tefillin and giving out blessings!!
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This month of Av, we highlight the Jewish birthday! Take a moment to find out what the big deal is, why we celebrate and what day your special day really is!! 
We started the month with birthdays and will end it with a birthday as well! Join us on Sunday, August 8th for a communal BBQ at Collins Park, also Mendels Hebrew birthday. He will be at hand with his Tefillin and giving out blessings!!Image attachmentImage attachment

True love is...
What is more important in marriage? Love or commitment?

I suspect that if a survey was conducted on this issue, those who have never experienced a relationship would point to love as the most important, while those who had or are currently in a relationship would point to commitment.

As a member of the second group, this is my reasoning:

If marriage is like a building, commitment is the foundation. Without a foundation, even the most beautiful building will not last: it would be knocked to the ground as soon as a storm appears (we've had many a storm this month, and the tent's toppling is a testament to these words!)

Yes, love is exciting and filled with passion, but then again, a foundation might be the most boring thing you ever saw. Nevertheless, it is the most fundamental element for the longevity of the building.

The same is true of our relationship with G-d.

We often think of our relationship with G-d in emotional terms. We love G-d, we are grateful for what G-d does for us, and perhaps we avoid doing the wrong things so as not to “upset G-d”.

But, like any other relationship, the foundation must be commitment.

This week's Torah portion is called "Eikev - because" which can also be translated as "heel." In Chassidic teaching, the heel - the area in the body with the least sensitive skin - symbolizes commitment that precedes feelings.

At a time when we constantly discuss our feelings (and that's a good thing!) it's important not to forget commitment.

When we are committed, we stick to it, even when it is difficult.

I think of the Rebbe's father, Rabbi Levi Yitzchak Schneersohn, whose Yahrzeit we commemorated yesterday.

During the darkest days of Soviet Russia, when Jews were persecuted for their religious beliefs, he served as a Rabbi in Ukraine.

At one point, the government demanded that he certify flour as Kosher for Passover, even though it was not. He refused, knowing well that he will pay dearly for his refusal. Eventually, the government buckled and allowed him to oversee the milling process, ensuring the highest standard of Kashrut for flour made in the Soviet Union!

There is so much to learn from Rabbi Levi Yitzchok- we will be doing a class on Tuesday at 7pm on this topic- join the class at Clifton Park Chabad's Zoom room.

May we be inspired by Rabbi Levi Yitzchak's commitment, and may all enjoy meaningful & committed relationships with G-d and our fellows,

Shabbat Shalom, Good Shabbos! Light candles at 8:00 pm, Shabbat ends at 9:05 pm

Rabbi Yossi & Leah Rubin

Join us for Outdoor Shabbat services at 10:30 am

When praying, please have in mind Aviva bat Rochel and Rochel bat Yitta for a complete and miraculous healing.
... See MoreSee Less

True love is...
What is more important in marriage? Love or commitment?

I suspect that if a survey was conducted on this issue, those who have never experienced a relationship would point to love as the most important, while those who had or are currently in a relationship would point to commitment.

As a member of the second group, this is my reasoning:

If marriage is like a building, commitment is the foundation. Without a foundation, even the most beautiful building will not last: it would be knocked to the ground as soon as a storm appears (weve had many a storm this month, and the tents toppling is a testament to these words!)

Yes, love is exciting and filled with passion, but then again, a foundation might be the most boring thing you ever saw. Nevertheless, it is the most fundamental element for the longevity of the building.

The same is true of our relationship with G-d.

We often think of our relationship with G-d in emotional terms. We love G-d, we are grateful for what G-d does for us, and perhaps we avoid doing the wrong things so as not to “upset G-d”.

But, like any other relationship, the foundation must be commitment.

This weeks Torah portion is called Eikev - because which can also be translated as heel. In Chassidic teaching, the heel - the area in the body with the least sensitive skin - symbolizes commitment that precedes feelings. 

At a time when we constantly discuss our feelings (and thats a good thing!) its important not to forget commitment. 

When we are committed, we stick to it, even when it is difficult.

I think of the Rebbes father, Rabbi Levi Yitzchak Schneersohn, whose Yahrzeit we commemorated yesterday. 

During the darkest days of Soviet Russia, when Jews were persecuted for their religious beliefs, he served as a Rabbi in Ukraine. 

At one point, the government demanded that he certify flour as Kosher for Passover, even though it was not. He refused, knowing well that he will pay dearly for his refusal. Eventually, the government buckled and allowed him to oversee the milling process, ensuring the highest standard of Kashrut for flour made in the Soviet Union!

There is so much to learn from Rabbi Levi Yitzchok- we will be doing a class on Tuesday at 7pm on this topic- join the class at Clifton Park Chabads Zoom room.

May we be inspired by Rabbi Levi Yitzchaks commitment, and may all enjoy meaningful & committed relationships with G-d and our fellows,

Shabbat Shalom, Good Shabbos! Light candles at 8:00 pm, Shabbat ends at 9:05 pm

Rabbi Yossi & Leah Rubin

Join us for Outdoor Shabbat services at 10:30 am

When praying, please have in mind Aviva bat Rochel and Rochel bat Yitta for a complete and miraculous healing.Image attachment

It’s a good world out there 🙂 ... See MoreSee Less

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The children are doing such a beautiful job. Enjoyed seeing all the pics. Thank you for sharing.

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